Black and White Sunday: Typical

A typical Cape Cod lighthouse

I am uncertain as to which lighthouse this is, either Wood End or Long Point at the end of the spit near Provincetown.  Cape Cod (Massachusetts, United States) is a fascinating place to visit if you are a lighthouse lover as you will find more than a dozen in a reasonably small area. Some of them have had to be moved further inland as the constant pounding of the surf has caused sea erosion along the coastline. Some are even open to the public.

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Thursday Special

Paula’s (Lost in Translation) challenge this week is slightly different than usual in that she has provided a list of words from which to pick one to illustrate.

I am going for decrepit: adjective meaning  – worn out or ruined because of age or neglect; dilapidated; rickety; run-down; broken-down; ramshackle; worn-out; derelict; falling to pieces; on its last legs

I like photographing old and decrepit things and on a trip around the Canyons a few years ago we came across this abandoned ‘village’ near Marble Canyon, AZ. During the Great Depression, a few white settlers built a small town of wooden structures with shingle roofs that still cling to gigantic boulders in a moon-like setting at the foot of Vermilion Cliffs. They were known as the Cliff Dwellers.

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How anyone survived in this desolate landscape I have no idea.

Please pop over to see Paula if you would like to join in.

California dreaming

Everything is free

Walking along the shoreline in San Diego I was virtually swamped by an explosion of colour – first these vibrant vending machines offering me a multitude of free advertising leaflets and then a stall full of colourful ceramic fishes.

Colourful fishies

I was definitely getting into the carnival spirit

and by the time I reached the kites down at Seaport Village

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my energy levels were rising

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and I was feeling very happy. After all it was February and here I was walking in sunny California 🙂

Don’t you feel more cheerful now?

Painted Ladies of San Francisco

The “Painted Ladies” of San Francisco sounds quite scandalous, but is actually a nickname for the city’s Victorian and Edwardian mansions with their genteel pastel hues and feminine façades, lacy wooden mantles and perfectly pitched roofs.

Postcard Row

One of the most photographed vistas is from Alamo Square on the corner of Hays and Steiner where you get a background of the modern city that contrasts with these lovely ladies. It is sometimes known as “Postcard Row.” The houses were built between 1892 and 1896 by developer Matthew Kavanaugh, who lived next door in the 1892 mansion at 722 Steiner Street.  The definition of a painted lady is a Victorian with three or more paint colours. So, even though the seven on Steiner Street are the most famous — there are several other painted ladies in the neighbourhood to enjoy.

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Explore the streets, parks and vistas around Scott Street, McAllister, Haight Street, Steiner and Pierce that tell the story of a Victorian era and discover more beautiful mansions, but be warned, it is very hilly around here so it can be quite a strenuous walk. Alamo square is a great place to sit and rest and admire the view after your walk around the neighbourhood.

I walked about 10 blocks from the Misión San Francisco de Asís on 16th Street which is some distance away, through Duboce Park. You can of course take public transport to Alamo Square, but then you’d miss an awful lot of this wonderful architecture. And don’t forget to look up!

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This monthly challenge is hosted by Dawn from ‘The Day After’ who invites participants to post pictures of any windows that  they find curious, inviting, photogenic, or in some way tell a story. Visit her blog to see more windows and/or to join in with the challenge.