WPC: Unusual

I am in Doncaster, South Yorkshire at the moment as my son is in hospital there. The daily route to the hospital goes along Town Moor Avenue which is opposite the racecourse. The field itself I remember as where my children played school sports. The houses along this road are quite spectacular (and very large) and today I managed to snap one of the more unusual ones through the bus window.

This conservation area contains Town Field itself and the planned suburban expansion of Doncaster’s residential area carried out in the early twentieth century along its northern side. The architecture of most of the buildings date from this period. The land was developed by Harold Arnold and Son from 1901 and it can be seen that the architects were influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement of the late 19th century. This was based on a dislike of mechanical ornamentation and a belief in the return to hand craftsmanship and simpler forms.

Buildings are mainly two-storied, although along and towards Thorne Road there are three-storied development. They are predominantly in red brick with slate or small red clay plain tiles. There are often elaborate forms of buildings with decorative architectural features, such as windows, doors, chimneys, bays, turrets, gables and porches. There are also areas of half timbering, stucco and decorative brickwork. Front boundary walls are generally low brick walls with castellated terracotta decorative copings often backed with hedges or shrubs.

Doncaster – Town Field was designated a conservation area on 8 April 1991.

Source: DMBC

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Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: The Administration Pavilion

Now for the surprise. The interior of that marvellous Administration building which welcomes you to the site. I would imagine that simply walking into this building would immediately lift your senses. As for working here…

The magnificent staircase that leads up from the impressive foyer is a perfect example of the relationship between architecture and decoration.

The small cupola over the stairs is a stained glass skylight that fulfils one of the principles of Modernism: that of assigning a prominent role to light and colour. Something that Domènech i Montaner was master of.

The ceiling is made up of nine vaults resting on stone and marble columns. All the vaults are clad in pink-lilac rectangular tiles, arranged like sprigs.

The central vault features emblems of Barcelona and Catalonia, the cross of Barcelona Cathedral and the cross of Saint Jordi.

You can go up that magnificent staircase, where you will find a corridor of glass and stained-glass windows and a particularly dramatic hall where the ceramics and the stonework leave you with your mouth open.

You could spend a lot of time simply admiring the craftsmanship in this hall.

This is the last of my series on the Art Nouveau site. I do hope I haven’t bored you all, but it is a fascinating and very rare example of that style of architecture and it is admirable that the work carried out has been done to meet three fundamental criteria: recover the original constructions designed by Domènech i Montaner, transform the pavilions in to functional work spaces and apply sustainability and energy saving parameters.


Source: All the information in these Sant Pau posts is taken from the admission booklet. 

How to get there:
Metro: L5 Sant Pau / Dos de Maig or L2 to Sagrada Familia and walk up Avenue de Gaudi
Bus: H8, 19, 20, 45, 47, 50, 51, 92, 117, 192

Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: Surgery Pavilion

The front facade of the Surgery Pavilion (Casa d’Operacions) is incredibly elaborate with sculptures galore. The doorway features two angels by Paul Gargallo in that distinctive Art Nouveau style. Two spectacular open-mouthed winged dragons protect the emblems on the first-floor balcony and support the two lions that represent the Hospital de la Santa Creu and the City of Barcelona.

On the balcony above the entrance gallery there are several angels and the frontage is crowned by an angel with wings unfolded seemingly about to take flight. Two winged lions sit below.

And on the corners are winged monsters which symbolise the forces of the unknown world, of negativity and of death.

The roof from the rear with a similar angel appealing for divine grace perhaps?
Casa D’Operacions in the centre of the site, and the railings show where the tunnels exit.

Finally another view of the site from the Administration Pavilion with the Surgery Pavilion in the centre and the open layout of the gardens. In front you can just about make out a replica of the cross which formerly stood in the middle of the Gothic cloister at the Hospital de la Santa Creu (1401).


Source: All the information in these Sant Pau posts is taken from the admission booklet. 

How to get there:
Metro: L5 Sant Pau / Dos de Maig or L2 to Sagrada Familia and walk up Avenue de Gaudi
Bus: H8, 19, 20, 45, 47, 50, 51, 92, 117, 192

Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: La Purissima (3)

La Puríssima was built between 1905 and 1912 and was used for General Surgery and Neurology.

I love the way each pavilion has its own private garden. Orange and lemon trees and lavender fill the beds around the sweeping steps.

Guardian Angels

Source: All the information in these Sant Pau posts is taken from the admission booklet. 

How to get there:
Metro: L5 Sant Pau / Dos de Maig or L2 to Sagrada Familia and walk up Avenue de Gaudi
Bus: H8, 19, 20, 45, 47, 50, 51, 92, 117, 192

Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: Nostra Senyora del Carme (5)

When you first enter the site and see these wonderful restored buildings you may think they are all the same. Look carefully at the roofs and the windows as they are of different styles and patterns. Some windows still have the original shutters.

The most prominent figure-symbol is the guardian angel, who may appear in the guise of a man, woman or child. Examine each of the statues on the pavilions as they have such angels guarding them.

And each of the water towers has the same decorative floral ceramic tiles at its base. But look at the upper ring of tiles and you will notice they are all different. The small domed roofs follow the same pattern: a main copper-coloured body of monochrome tiles closed off by three upper rings that converge on the stone lantern.


Source: All the information in these Sant Pau posts is taken from the admission booklet. 

How to get there:
Metro: L5 Sant Pau / Dos de Maig or L2 to Sagrada Familia and walk up Avenue de Gaudi
Bus: H8, 19, 20, 45, 47, 50, 51, 92, 117, 192