Black and White Sunday: Imperfect

An imperfect photo? Surely not o_O However the subject of this image was seriously flawed.

Thursday September 15th 2016: We deliberately meandered along the foggy shores of the Firth of Forth on our way to Edinburgh with the purpose of stopping in North Berwick and having seafood chowder or lobster bisque for lunch from the well-known Lobster Shack.

Mouths watering in anticipation we made our damp way to the harbour and then saw that the shutters were down. Gutted! Closed except for weekends.

Please visit Paula to see other representations of this week’s challenge.

Black and White Sunday: A View fit for a Queen

queens-view-in-bw

The Queen’s View in Highland Perthshire overlooks Loch Tummel. Queen Victoria is said to have remarked that the spectacular view was named after her, when she visited the area in 1866. However, it has also been suggested that the view was in fact named after King Robert the Bruce’s wife, Isabella, over 550 years earlier. Although she never actually became queen as she died in 1296 ten years before Bruce was crowned king. She was just 19 years old.

Whichever version you prefer, the view is stunning.

Black and White Sunday

Lost at Sea

Paula’s black and white Sunday this week is ‘Traces of the Past’.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This bronze by Jill Watson was commissioned by the people of Berwickshire to commemorate the women and children left by the East Coast Fishing Disaster of 1881.

The small bronze figures are the wives and children of Charles Purves, James and William Thorburn, three men lost at sea in 1881 from the fishing village of St Abbs. In total 189 men from the east coast of Scotland perished on that fateful day.

Kirkcudbright Harbour

rust

noun
  1. a reddish- or yellowish-brown flaking coating of iron oxide that is formed on iron or steel by oxidation, especially in the presence of moisture.

    The fishing fleet in Kirkcudbright provided me with plenty of photos for this week’s word challenge, those ‘torture instruments’ are used for dredging scallops – I think!

    rust

A Walk along the Dee

It was another lovely evening and time for some exercise. We decided to take the riverside walk following the tidal waters of the River Dee up to Tongland Bridge. A three and a half mile stroll along a level path felt doable and would take us around a couple of hours if we didn’t stop too many times to take photos.

DSCF9388

“While looking towards the north the scene is truly delightful, the banks of the river, from Tongland to the sea, being peculiarly rich in natural beauty. In the foreground is the river sparkling in the sun’s rays, and winding like a silver thread among the green meadows; while the grounds around Compstone, sloping gently to the river’s margin, are clothed with plantations of great freshness and beauty.”

Rambles in Galloway, by M. McL., Harper.1876.

The tree-lined Dee Walk begins at the end of the Kirkcudbright bridge and continues upstream alongside the river.

DSCF9421

At the end of the walk several paths lead off back into town, but carry on across the open grass and then after crossing a wooden footbridge (3/4 mile) turn left and walk along the flood embankment by the riverside hedgerow.

Unfortunately it was low tide, so the walk wasn’t as picturesque as it may be when the river is in full flow. Mud banks aren’t the prettiest of things, but still it was a lovely sunny evening and the wet mud glistened silver in the late sunlight.

DSCF9462

DSCF9450

Several abandoned boats provided photo opportunities

And a cormorant standing out on the sand bank drying his wings

DSCF9455

There are good views over the reed beds and the odd bench provides a rest and chance to look back at the town.

DSCF9472

DSCF9449

DSCF9484

Just before the Bridge, there is an attractive strip of deciduous woodland, with some steep drops by the river side.

DSCF9495

DSCF9522

And finally we reached the bridge. Which proved very difficult to photograph because of all the trees and scrub in front of it. This is a Thomas Telford design with three Gothic-pointed arches. The crenellated towers and the corbelled parapets are the work of Alexander Nasmyth.

DSCF9505

We returned to the town by retracing our steps, though we could have followed the road back as there is a roadside footpath. There we picked up some excellent fish and chips from Polarbites and took them back to our cottage to eat.

If you enjoy a walk, short or long, then you may enjoy visiting Jo’s Monday Walk where you are in for a treat.