The Glory of the Garden

Watching the RHS Chelsea flower show yesterday evening there was a piece on Pennard Plants. Their Chelsea display is a garden based on a Rudyard Kipling poem “The Glory of the Garden” and aims to demonstrate all that is good about the English garden, using flowers and vegetables.

It reminded me that I have written a post about this marvellous poem and the house and garden where Kipling last lived. It is also fitting that this year is 150 years since his birth.

Enjoy the poem and the garden, comments are very welcome on the original post.

“OUR England is a garden that is full of stately views,
Of borders, beds and shrubberies and lawns and avenues,
With statues on the terraces and peacocks strutting by;
But the Glory of the Garden lies in more than meets the eye…”

Earth laughs in flowers

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Bateman’s is a 17th-century house located in the pretty white weather-boarded village of Burwash, East Sussex, England. Author Rudyard Kipling lived in Bateman’s from 1902 to his death in 1936. His wife left the house to the National Truston her death in 1939, and it has since been opened to the public. If you are a fan of Kipling then the beautiful Jacobean house with its six stack column chimneys will be a draw as it has been left exactly as when the family lived there, including an impressive study where Kipling wrote and a room where manuscripts and unusual objects and collections are displayed. The interior of the house reflects Kipling’s strong links with the Indian subcontinent including many oriental rugs and Indian works of art and artifacts.

Explore the English country gardens with the manicured lawns and clipped yew hedges, lily pond and roses then wander through the meadow with…

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Heyjude

I live in the UK, but when I was younger I spent several years travelling the world followed by a period living in South Africa. I look forward to a long and leisurely retirement doing what I like most - gardening, photography, walking and travelling.