Capturing Cornwall (Carnewas)

We started at the NT car park at Carnewas (along the north Cornish coast half-way between Padstow and Newquay) where there is a lovely tea-room which is open throughout the summer months. From here you cannot see anything of the coastline. DSCF5515 Well established paths lead you through the gorse on a detour to the cliffs from where you have amazing views of the cliffs in both directions, along to Trevose Head and the spectacular sea stacks at Bedruthan beach and south towards Mawgan Porth.

DSCF5524
Coastal Path looking south
DSCF5530
Looking north to the Bedruthan Steps
Looking Down
Looking Down

After admiring the views return to the main path and continue down the wide steps to the bottom where you have good views over the beach when there is a low tide, or the waves crashing over the rocks when there isn’t.

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,

~ John Masefield

When the tide is out you can take the steep stone beach steps to access the beach. (These steps are closed from November and there is no swimming from this beach because of the currents).

The rest of the route includes slopes, steps and unfenced cliff top, none of which are attractive to the OH, so we returned to the café for a cool glass of ginger beer.

Trevose Head in the distance
Trevose Head in the distance

There is no record of the name “Bedruthan Steps” before 1847, but it is thought to have originally referred to one of the two cliff staircases to access Carnewas mine (presumably the one nearer to the village of Bedruthan). The name later also became used for the name of the beach itself.

The legend of Bedruthan Steps was invented for Victorian tourism, said to be taken from a mythological giant (Bedruthan) who used the rocks as stepping stones. These were formed after the last Ice Age, when rising sea levels eroded the surrounding soft shales to leave the harder rocks as islands. Each of the 5 rock stacks has a name (Queen Bess, Samaritan Island, Redcove Island, Pendarves Island and Carnewas Island). DSCF5543 This is a very short walk, but can be extended if you continue along the south-west coastal path to Porth Mear or in the other direction to Mawgan Porth returning through the countryside.

If you enjoy a walk, short or long, then you may enjoy visiting Jo’s Monday Walk where you are in for a treat.

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Heyjude

I live in the UK, but when I was younger I spent several years travelling the world followed by a period living in South Africa. I look forward to a long and leisurely retirement doing what I like most - gardening, photography, walking and travelling.

57 thoughts on “Capturing Cornwall (Carnewas)”

    1. Thanks Dina – I see you have been browsing through the Cornish posts. I hope to start a new blog soon specifically for Cornwall and one of the places I want to go to is Bedruthen Steps when the tide is out so I can walk amongst these stacks. Quite reminiscent of the Great Ocean Road in Australia 🙂

    1. Indeed it has! I would have liked to take Alex here last year, but it would have been too much for him to get up and down those steps. Next time he visits maybe.

    1. Don’t tell me you are getting fed up of all-year sunshine Sylvia? I must admit I gave up walking anywhere in Florida due to the heat and humidity.

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