Lingering Look at Architecture: Bridges

Dawn of “The Day After” runs a monthly architecture challenge as well as her windows. May  is the month for Bridges.

I like photographing bridges, many of which have great architectural and historical features, and have done so several times within the topic of a photography challenge. (click on the image to enlarge)

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Top right: Dinham Bridge, Ludlow;
Metal bridges: Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, USA; Jackfield Bridge, Shropshire, England; Sydney Harbour Bridge, Sydney, Australia; Burrard Street Bridge, Vancouver, Canada;
Bottom Left: Ironbridge, Shropshire, England
Wooden/stone bridges: Wooden Bridge, Clun, Shropshire, England; Gallox Bridge, Somerset, England; Albany Covered Bridge, New Hampshire, USA; Packhorse Bridge, Clun, Shropshire, England

Header: Rope Bridge in the Lost Gardens of Heligan, Cornwall, England

Oh what a tangle

Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla)

The Moreton Bay fig tree with its powerful buttresses and long dangling, intertwisted aerial roots creates a sense of awe and wonder. The characteristic “melting” appearance is due to its habit of dropping aerial roots from its branches, which upon reaching the ground, thicken into supplementary trunks which help to support the weight of its crown.

Bench series #21

For the month of May I’m looking for benches at the beach

Hive Beach Burton Bradstock
Hive Beach, Burton Bradstock, West Dorset, England

If you would like to join in with the Bench photo challenge then please take a look at my Bench Series page. No complicated rules, just a bench and a camera required :)

  • Create your own post and title it Bench Series: May
  • Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
  • Add the tag ‘bench series’ so everyone can find the benches easily in the WP Reader
  • Get your post in by the end of the month, as the new bench theme comes out on the first Sunday in June.

My Picks of the Week:

Debbie heads to La Barceloneta where lots of folk are lying around in the sun.
Pauline finds seclusion with a view.
Tgeriatrix is in Scheveningen where even the clouds are flat.
Aletta is in one of my favourite locations – Hermanus, originally known as Hermanuspietersfontein. See her post to find out why it was changed!
and The Restless One, offers not only benches with beaches, but also pubs with lobster rolls (hopefully). Pop along and join her along the North Yorkshire coast.

A Lingering Look at Windows: In the Garden

Trelissick’s colourful history stretches as far back as 1750 but it’s most distinguished owner was Leonard Cunliffe, a former director of the bank of England.

Cunliffe fell in love with this Cornish house as he sailed past it on his yacht Laranda in the early 1900s. In 1937 he passed the house down to his stepdaughter Ida and her husband Ronald Copeland. Ronald was the chairman of the Spode-Copeland firm of bone china manufacturers in Staffordshire and hence part of the potteries aristocracy. They lived at Trelissick throughout their careers donating the house and gardens to the National Trust in 1955

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Trelissick has no less than four summer-houses. One in the area called Carcaddon*  has two beautiful stained-glass windows.

The magnolia, “Rustic Rubera” window is for Ida Copeland and highlights her time as an MP for Stoke from 1931 to 1935 and contains an excerpt from her maiden speech to Parliament on the introduction of import duties on inferior ceramics being imported from abroad, taking away work from highly skilled people and threatening their livelihood.

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The rhododendron, “Taurus” window celebrates Ronald Copeland’s passion for rhododendrons and retells a story told by Harold Holdway, chief designer at the Copeland factory in Stoke. Mr Copeland took his prized rhododendrons from Trelissick and had Harold Holdway create designs from them for a Botanical series.

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*The Cornish prefix ‘Car’ or ‘Caer’ denotes a fortified place. It contains mass plantings of daffodils followed by camellias, magnolias (including magnolia Trelissick), rhododendrons, viburnum and many other shrubs. Deutzia gives an early summer show, and lace-cap hydrangeas offer colour well into autumn.

This monthly challenge is hosted by Dawn from ‘The Day After’ who invites participants to post pictures of any windows that  they find curious, inviting, photogenic, or in some way tell a story. Visit her blog to see more windows and/or to join in with the challenge.